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Second Woman Charged in 'Jihad Jane' Conspiracy

05:53, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

The honorees, Carolyn Barcus, JoAn Criddle and   Marilynne Glatfelter, will be recognized at a ceremony The TIFFANY KNOTS EARRINGS will take place in the Evan N. Stevenson Ballroom of Taggart   Student Center on the USU campus. Family, friends and the public are   invited.


Service has been a significant part of each of the   three recipients' lives as each has served the role of advocate, mentor and   activist in the community and for women of all ages.


"These women have shown us by their actions in the   community, academy and business how to create a better world for all women,"   said Michelle Bogdan, director of the Women's Resource Center.


With the inclusion of these women, the USU Women's   Center will have recognized more than 100 women from Cache Valley in the last   quarter century. Carolyn Barcus earned both a master's and a doctor of education   degree from USU. She began her career as a mental health specialist for the   Indian Health Services, and later worked with the same organization as a service   unit director.


She returned to USU in the 1980s when she joined the   Psychology Department as an adjunct professor and Navajo Student Advisor. Barcus   has been involved with the American Indian Support Project at USU since its   beginning. She became the director of the program in 1991, an appointment she   still holds.


Barcus' colleagues stated that she "provides   powerfully important advocacy, training and mentoring for diverse students in   our program and across the country." All this is balanced with a strong dose of   genuine caring as she shares her ranch home, horses and hobbies with others in   the community.


JoAn Criddle began her education at USU. She quit   school after TIFFANY KNOTS EARRINGS to provide the means for her husband's financial aid.   After raising five children, she returned to school for a bachelor's degree in   child and family behavioral science from Sacramento City College. She continued   her education in the area of counseling at Sacramento State University.


Criddle's interest in caring for others led her to   author four books. Two of these books are about her experiences with a Cambodian   refugee family she helped sponsor while living in Davis, Calif.


"She is very conscious of humanitarian concerns,"   said one nominator of Criddle. This can be seen in her tireless support of many   organizations, including Hope International, Bridgerland Literacy and Red Cross.   She has co-directed the international vision and eyeglass program of The Hope   Alliance for the past five years.


Marilynne Glatfelter began her education at Knox   College with a bachelor's degree in English. She followed this by earning a   master's degree from Indiana University and a doctorate in counseling psychology   from the University of Minnesota.


It is through Glatfelter's work at USU that she   influenced the lives of others, especially women. She was hired as the first   female therapist in the USU Counseling Center. During this time she became a   founding member of the Women's Center and served on its advisory board for many   years.


"Marilynne's career has been and remains a   fascinating journey, during which she broke many barriers and 'glass ceilings'"   said one of her nominators.


This is evident in her current role as president of   Logan club of Rotary International, which she joined in 1989 as the third female   member in its history.


For more information about the Women Over 65 Lifetime   Achievement Ceremony, contact the USU Women's HEART LINK DROP EARRINGS at 435-797-1728 or email   [email protected] more information please contact: Sarabjit Jagirdar,   Email:-



UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY WOMEN OVER 65 ACHIEVEMENT AWARD HONORS THREE

05:52, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

The honorees, Carolyn Barcus, JoAn Criddle and   Marilynne Glatfelter, will be recognized at a Elsa Peretti Sevillana earrings Wednesday, April 7, at   6:30 p.m. The event will take place in the Evan N. Stevenson Ballroom of Taggart   Student Center on the USU campus. Family, friends and the public are   invited.


Service has been a significant part of each of the   three recipients' lives as each has served the role of advocate, mentor and   activist in the community and for women of all ages.


"These women have shown us by their actions in the   community, academy and business how to create a better world for all women,"   said Michelle Bogdan, director of the Women's Resource Center.


With the inclusion of these women, the USU Women's   Center will have recognized more than 100 women from Cache Valley in the last   quarter century. Carolyn Barcus earned both a master's and a doctor of education   degree from USU. She began her career as a mental health specialist for the   Indian Health Services, and later worked with the same organization as a service   unit director.


She returned to USU in the 1980s when she joined the   Psychology Department as an adjunct professor and Navajo Student Advisor. Barcus   has been involved with the American Indian Support Project at USU since its   beginning. She became the director of the program in 1991, an appointment she   still holds.


Barcus' colleagues stated that she "provides   powerfully important advocacy, training and mentoring for diverse students in   our program and across the country." All this is balanced with a strong dose of   genuine caring as she shares her ranch home, horses and hobbies with others in   the community.


JoAn Criddle began her education at TIFFANY KNOTS EARRINGS. She quit   school after marriage to provide the means for her husband's financial aid.   After raising five children, she returned to school for a bachelor's degree in   child and family behavioral science from Sacramento City College. She continued   her education in the area of counseling at Sacramento State University.


Criddle's interest in caring for others led her to   author four books. Two of these books are about her experiences with a Cambodian   refugee family she helped sponsor while living in Davis, Calif.


"She is very conscious of humanitarian concerns,"   said one nominator of Criddle. This can be seen in her tireless support of many   organizations, including Hope International, Bridgerland Literacy and Red Cross.   She has co-directed the international vision and eyeglass program of The Hope   Alliance for the past five years.


Marilynne Glatfelter began her education at Knox   College with a bachelor's degree in English. She followed this by earning a   master's degree from Indiana University and a doctorate in counseling psychology   from the University of Minnesota.


It is through Glatfelter's work at USU that she   influenced the lives of others, especially women. She was hired as the first   female therapist in the USU Counseling Center. During this time she became a   founding member of the Women's Center and served on its advisory board for many   years.


"Marilynne's career has been and remains a   fascinating journey, during which she broke many barriers and 'glass ceilings'"   said one of her nominators.


This is evident in her current role as president of   Logan club of Rotary International, which she joined in 1989 as the third female   member in its history.


For more information about the Women Over 65 Lifetime   Achievement Ceremony, contact the USU Women's Center at 435-797-1728 or email   [email protected] more information please contact: Sarabjit Jagirdar,   Email:-



US 4TH FLEET WOMEN CELEBRATE PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE

05:51, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

 By Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class (SW) Holly   Boynton, U.S. Naval Elsa Peretti Full Heart earrings Southern Command and U.S. Fourth Fleet


Female staff members from U.S. Naval Forces Southern   Command and U.S. 4th Fleet (NAVSO/C4F) celebrated Women's History Month with   Commander, NAVSO/C4F Rear Adm. Vic Guillory March 25.


NAVSO/C4F's diversity committee, led by Chief   Operations Specialist (SW) Kareem Coley, held a luncheon to honor the active   duty, reserve and civilian women of NAVSO/C4F and share their experiences as   women in the military. Guillory praised his staff for their service and pointed   out the Navy's goals to increase the percentage of females in the Navy.


"The Navy aims to grow the number of enlisted women   from just short of 16 percent, to at least one-quarter of the enlisted ranks by   2037," said Guillory. "Here at Fourth Fleet, we already hit that last goal:   Twenty-five percent of our enlisted ranks are female. On the Officer's side, at   18 percent female, we are also ahead of the Navy average of 15 percent, and one   quarter of our civilian employees are women. Overall, our staff of 162 military   and civilians are 22 percent female. That's not a bad number, but one I would   like to see increase."


Many of the female members of NAVSO/C4F are pioneers   in their own right, holding the distinction of being the first female to do a   variety of missions.


"I was among the first of 80 Navy women to be   Elsa Peretti Teardrop earrings on Naval Station, Adak, Alaska (isolated duty) in February 1979," said   Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Karen Munce.


Munce recalled during her career, women serving on   ships were another 'first.'


"In November of 1983, I was among the first female   Sailors to be placed on the USS Hunley (AS-31) out of Holy Loch, Scotland," said   Munce. "Women were only placed on tenders at that time - both submarine tenders   and destroyer tenders. Now women are on the actual destroyers, and current plans   are under way to put women on submarines."


NAVSO/C4F's civilian females also bring a wealth of   knowledge and experience to the staff. Rita Braley, NAVSO/C4F deputy for   resources, has more than 30 years of experience working for the military,   including her time as an enlisted Soldier in the Army.


"In 1978 at Ft. Jackson, S.C., I was assigned to the   first coed basic training platoon," said Braley. "My first permanent duty   station was at the Florida Phase of the Army Ranger training school and I was   the one of two active duty females assigned. There were no active duty females   at either the HQ (headquarters) at Ft. Benning or at the Dahlonega, Ga. Mountain   Phase. My next duty station was 1st Infantry Div (FWD) Mechanized in Germany and   there were only eight females assigned."


"The changes in life for women in the military today   are greatly improved and the opportunities for assignments and career fields   much wider than when I joined the Army," said Braley. "Women have always been   ready to serve our country, but were not always allowed to in the same ways as   our male counterparts. There are still many assignments not open for women, but   you never know what the future holds."


NAVSO is the naval component command for U.S.   Southern Command and is responsible for all maritime assets in the area of   responsibility. C4F is the numbered fleet assigned to NAVSO to carry out a   variety of missions, including humanitarian assistance and disaster response,   counter illicit trafficking operations, and partnership building Elsa Peretti Open Heart drop earrings theater   security cooperation activities.For more information please contact: Sarabjit   Jagirdar, Email:-



TREASURY COMMITTEE PUBLISHES ITS REPORT, 'WOMEN IN THE CITY'

05:51, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

The Treasury Committee publishes its report, 'Women   in the City' - prompted by its work on the Elsa Peretti Eternal Circle earrings crisis, which shone a   spotlight on the need for reform to increase financial stability, including   improving corporate governance within financial institutions.


* Report: Women in the City


* Treasury Committee


Part of the debate on how to improve corporate   governance was around boosting diversity and challenge in the City. Witnesses to   the Committee even suggested that greater female representation at senior levels   would have made the banking crisis less likely.


Today's report says "the lack of diversity on the   boards of many, if not most, of our major financial institutions, may have   heightened the problems of 'group-think' and made effective challenge and   scrutiny of executive decisions less effective".


Moreover, "a sector which is failing to properly   utilise the talents of over half the population clearly has substantial room for   improvement", the report says.


This entails looking more widely at the industry   structure, to ensure that able women who wish to progress are not held back,   which is why the report also examines matters such as the long hours culture,   the working environment and access to flexible working and family-friendly   practices.


John McFall MP, Chair of the Committee said:


"Our work on the banking crisis highlighted the need   for substantial improvement in Tiffany Elsa Peretti Sevillana earrings governance in the City. Diversity at   the top is one way to challenge potentially dangerous 'group-think'.


"We are not saying that had women been in charge, the   crisis wouldn't have happened, but we are highlighting the fact that women are   poorly represented in the financial sector, particularly at senior level.


"Moreover, it can only surely be in the interests of   financial institutions themselves to try to boost female representation at   senior level and thus try to embed diversity and challenge more deeply into the   culture of banking."


The report notes that the challenge is not so much to   change the legal framework, but to change practice and, where necessary,   culture. The onus is on the City to demonstrate that it is committed to   improving the representation of women at senior levels within the industry.


Whilst the Committee does not believe this should be   achieved through the introduction of a quota system, it is clear that such   pressure will intensify should the industry fail to act.


The report notes with disappointment that the CBI no   longer appears to be working on a voluntary pledge to encourage its members to   increase the number of women employed at senior levels.


However, the Committee was heartened to hear that the   Minister for Trade, Investment and Small Business, had written to the Financial   Reporting Council regarding diversity at senior level and today's report urges   the FRC to respond as soon as possible.


Mr McFall MP added:


"Not only are there disappointingly few women on   boards, there is a significant pay gap in financial services. Most worryingly,   there is evidence that the pay gap exists at entry level.


"Detailed figures are in the memorandum we received   from the Chartered Management Institute. Elsa Peretti Bean earrings report urges the City to take   matters into its own hands and improve gender diversity.


"However, we recommend that the Treasury Committee in   the next Parliament monitors this: I am sure it will want to see evidence that   this voluntary approach is yielding results. If it does not, then the pressure   for compulsory measures is likely to grow."


Image: iStockphoto



MOST WOMEN UNAWARE OF RISK FOR DEBILITATING FRACTURES

05:50, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

Many women with an elevated risk for   osteoporosis-related fractures fail to perceive Tiffany 1837 Bar drop earrings as high risk compared   with other women of the same age.


These findings-part of the international Global   Longitudinal Study of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW)-are published in the April 1,   2010, edition of the journal Osteoporosis International. The GLOW study includes   data from more than 60,000 women in 10 countries.


Of the 28,000 U.S. women enrolled in GLOW, 3,128 were   from Southwest Ohio. University of Cincinnati (UC) professor and UC Health   endocrinologist Nelson Watts, MD, led the local arm of GLOW, which found that of   the 3,128 women studied, only 40 percent of those with two or more risk factors   perceived themselves to be at higher risk for fracture than their age-matched   peers.


Of the 60,000 women studied across the globe, one in   three (33 percent) with two or more risk factors perceived themselves to be at   higher risk for fracture. Risk factors included diagnosis of osteoporosis,   previous fracture, low weight, recent falls and parental hip fracture.


Authors of the study say the failure by women to   appreciate their personal risk of fracture presents a barrier to receiving   appropriate management and safe and effective treatments.


Watts, director of UC's Bone Health and Osteoporosis   Center and professor of medicine, says, "Too few patients at risk for   osteoporosis are being tested and treated. A fracture can be a life-changing   event, and many of the fractures due to osteoporosis could be prevented."


Study authors urge improved education of both   physicians and postmenopausal women about osteoporosis risk factors.


Osteoporosis causes bones to become fragile and   therefore more likely to break. If left untreated, the disease can progress   painlessly until a fracture occurs. One in two women will suffer an   osteoporosis-related fracture after age 50. These fractures often carry with   them chronic pain, reduced mobility, loss of independence and, especially in the   case of hip fracture, an increased risk of death. Because the likelihood of   fractures increases substantially with age, fracture numbers are projected to   rise as the population ages. Several risk factors for fractures have been   identified and should be considered by physicians treating women age 55 and   over:


* older age


* low body weight


* parental hip fracture


* personal history of Paloma's X earrings (clavicle, arm, wrist,   spine, rib, hip, pelvis, upper leg, lower leg, ankle) since age 45


* two or more falls in the past year


* current use of cortisone or prednisone (steroids   often prescribed for a number of medical conditions)


* rheumatoid arthritis


* cigarette smoking


* consumption of three or more alcoholic beverages   daily.


Other risk factors include a variety of medical   conditions and medications. Although tools for diagnosis and risk assessment,   including bone density testing and the World Health Organization FRAX fracture   risk assessment tool, are widely available, the connection between identified   risk factors and serious fracture outcomes is not being made by a majority of   women who are at the highest risk. Since many fractures can be prevented by   appropriate treatment, it is important that elevated risk be recognized.


GLOW is based at the Center for Outcomes Research at   the University of Massachusetts Medical School and is supported by a grant from   the Alliance for Better Bone Health (formerly sanofi-aventis and P&G   Pharmaceuticals, now sanofi-aventis and Warner Chilcott) and is being directed   by the Center for Outcomes Research, University of Massachusetts Medical School.   Watts serves and a speaker and consultant for both sanofi-aventis and Warner   Chilcott as well as other companies with products to treat osteoporosis.


Watts and UC environmental health researcher Amit   Bhattacharya, PhD, recently formed a company based on technology they have   developed called "Bone Shock Absorbance." The company, OsteoDynamics, was formed   with the help of Integrated BioScience Solutions, LLC (IGBS), and the business   incubator BIOSTART, and will develop a new diagnostic tool to test a patient's   risk of bone fracture based on the Bone Shock Absorbance concept.


Bone Shock Absorbance is a non-invasive and painless   test that measures how the energy associated with simple heel strike by a   patient is propagated, absorbed and dissipated as its shock wave moves up a   patient's skeleton. The test provides information that measures a patient's bone   quality and appears to be a better indicator of fracture risk than the Paloma Picasso Loving Heart earrings   used methods that simply measure the mineral density of a patient's bones.For   more information please contact: Sarabjit Jagirdar



'JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON WOMEN, GENDER' PUBLISHES INAUGURAL ISSUE

05:49, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

The peer-reviewed Journal of Research on Women and   Gender is published by the Center for Multicultural Elsa Peretti Apple earrings Gender Studies and the   Women and Gender Research Collaborative at Texas State University-San Marcos.   The interdisciplinary journal, offered free annually over the World Wide Web,   features research, pedagogical topics and creative projects from scholars around   the world, including Texas State faculty. The inaugural issue includes 14   articles on:


* healthcare in Canada for people who are   transgender, two-spirit and intersexed


* women sports reporters who fought locker-room   discrimination in the 1970s


* gender equity in Zimbabwe


* the writings of Mayan women in the nineteenth   century


* female entrepreneurs in the United States


* Ntozake Shange's writings


* women's interpretations of women artists' music   videos


* transgender in the writings of playwright/novelist   Rachilde


* the life of au pairs in the Elsa Peretti Round earrings States


* Susana Rowson's novel Reuben and Rachel


* representations of female rock climbers


* female eudaimonia and female participation in the   economy


* gender differences in responsibility for crimes   among CSI victims


* female journalists' experiences of managerial   competencies in traditionally male-dominated Nepali newsrooms


"The journal presents an excellent opportunity to   showcase critical and creative thinking around issues of local, national, and   international importance," said Sandra Mayo, director of the Center for   Multicultural and Gender Studies, who organized the Women and Gender Research   Collaborative in 2008.


The journal's leadership includes executive editor   Kate Peirce, on the faculty of Texas State's School of Journalism and Mass   Communication; managing editor Terri Pantuso, Department of English; and   production editor Sheila Bustillos Reynolds, Office of the Vice President for   Student Affairs. The editorial board includes Return to Tiffany Round tag drop earrings Texas State faculty and   faculty from other institutions representing numerous disciplines. The editors   are seeking submissions for the next issue.


More about the journal and its submission guidelines   is available by visiting



GOLDEN EAGLE WOMEN OPEN WEEKEND WITH 5-2 WIN OVER SIUE

05:48, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

The Tennessee Tech women's tennis team got the   holiday weekend started with a victory Friday afternoon, Tiffany 1837 Hoop earrings visiting SIU   Edwardsville, 5-2, on a warm and sunny afternoon on the Tech campus courts.


Tech will host Murray State Saturday at 2 p.m. in an   Ohio Valley Conference contest.


Junior Diana Woodcock (in photo with head coach Kenny   Doyle) claimed the point that clinched the match, giving Tech a 4-2 lead with   her strreight set win at No. 2 singles. Junior Katie Barnhill tacked on the   fifth point, finish the day's action with a 6-2, 6-2 win at No. 6 singles.


The Golden Eagle women rolled to wins in all three   doubles contests to stake themselves to a 1-0 lead. The first match to finish   was an 8-0 shutout by Leydi Zora and Barnhill at the No. 3 position, topping   Kelsey Laird and Amanda Miller. Laura Porras and Woodcock paired up for an 8-3   win at No. 2 over Ali Wulfers and Amanda Niebur, then Victoria Cran and   Frederike Kahl outlasted Carli Connors and Maggie Boeckmen, 8-6, to nab the No.   1 spot.


Zora, a Golden Eagle freshman from Columbia, cruised   to a 6-1, 6-1 Elsa Peretti Open Heart earrings over Laird at No. 1 to get the singles play underway. Three   courts over, Porras also took a straight set win, topping Niebur, 6-2, 6-1.


The Cougars made it 3-2 as Boeckmen slipped past   Kahl, 6-3, 6-1, at No. 3 and Wulfers took a win at No. 5 when Joanna Corkern was   forced to retire due to an injury.


That set the stage for Woodcock to put the win into   the books when she walked off with a 6-2, 6-2 win over Connors at No. 2.   Barnhill's win at No. 6 came over Miller to end play.


Tech improved to 2-10 on the year while SIUE fell to   3-14.For more information please contact: Elsa Peretti Starfish earrings Jagirdar



GLOBAL LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF OSTEOPOROSIS IN WOMEN: UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA

05:48, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

Underscoring what researchers call a serious   international public health concern, results from the GlobalTiffany Cushion Hoop earrings Study   of Osteoporosis in Women (GLOW) reveal that many women at an elevated level of   risk for osteoporosis-associated fractures fail to perceive the implications of   the risk factors.


The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) is one   of 17 GLOW study sites in the world.


Study results showed that among postmenopausal women   from 10 countries in Europe, North America and Australia diagnosed with   osteoporosis - a condition putting them at high risk for fractures- only 43   percent thought their risk of a fracture was higher than other women their   age.


"Additionally, only one in three women in GLOW who   reported two or more major risk factors for fracture perceived themselves as   being at higher risk for fracture than their age-matched peers," said UAB's   Kenneth Saag, M.D., a study investigator and professor of medicine in the   Division of Clinical Immunology and Rheumatology.


This latest study from GLOW, which is based at the   Center for Outcomes Research at the University of Massachusetts Medical School,   was published today, April 2, online in the journal Osteoporosis International   and included more than 60,000 postmenopausal women in 10 countries.


"We've found that many women aren't making the   connection between their risk factors and the serious consequences of   fractures," said the lead author Ethel Siris, M.D., director of the Toni Stabile   Osteoporosis Center of the Columbia University Medical Center, New   York-Presbyterian Hospital. "Without a clear understanding of their risks, women   cannot begin to protect themselves from fracture."


One in two women will suffer an osteoporosis-related   fracture after age 50; these fractures often carry with them chronic pain,   reduced mobility, loss of independence and - in the case of hip fracture - an   increased risk of death. Because the likelihood of fractures increases   substantially with age, fracture numbers are projected to rise as the population   ages. Osteoporosis-related fractures are an international public health problem;   in addition to the human suffering associated with these fractures, they also   are the source of enormous health-care costs.


Improved education of physicians and postmenopausal   women about osteoporosis risk factors is urgently needed, according to the study   authors. Osteoporosis causes bones to become fragile and more likely to break.   If left untreated, the disease can progress painlessly until a fracture occurs.   Several risk factors for fractures have been identified and should be considered   by physicians treating women age 55 and older:


* older age


* low weight


* parental hip fracture


* personal history of fracture (clavicle, arm, wrist,   spine, rib, hip, pelvis, upper leg, lower leg, ankle) since age 45


* two or more falls in the past year


* current use of cortisone or Tiffany Cushion Hoop earrings(steroids   often prescribed for a number of medical conditions)


* rheumatoid arthritis


* cigarette smoking


* consumption of three or more alcoholic beverages   daily.


Other risk factors include a variety of medical   conditions and medications. Tools for diagnosis and risk assessment, including   bone-density testing and the World Health Organization FRAX fracture   risk-assessment tool, are widely available; still, the connection between   identified risk factors and serious fracture outcomes is not being made by a   majority of women at highest risk. Because many fractures can be prevented by   appropriate treatment, it is important that elevated risk be recognized.


"We hope the insight we obtain from GLOW will help   physicians and patients work together to identify those at risk for fracture and   to enhance understanding of the meaning of that risk," said Siris. "Education is   critical if we are to reduce the burden of fractures worldwide."


GLOW is a prospective, international cohort study of   women 55 years of age and older who visited their primary-care physician during   the two years prior to enrollment in the study. More than 60,000 women were   recruited by more than 700 primary-care physicians in 17 cities in 10 countries   (Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, United   Kingdom and the United States.) GLOW is gathering information on osteoporosis   risk factors, treatments, patient behaviors and fracture outcomes during a   five-year period. Self-perceived risk of fracture was assessed using a   five-point scale ranging from "much lower" to "much higher" risk than other   women of the same age.


Of the 28,000 U.S. women who participated in GLOW,   5,061 were enrolled through UAB's internal medicine or family practice clinics.   Almost a quarter (23 percent) of these women reported an osteoporosis diagnosis,   23 percent had a previous fracture, 12 percent were low weight, 41 percent   reported recent falls and 18 percent a parental hip fracture. Despite the high   prevalence of risk factors, only 35 percent of women with two or more major risk   factors perceived themselves to be at higher risk of a fracture than their   peers. This failure by women to appreciate their personal risk of fracture   presents a barrier to them receiving appropriate management and safe, effective   treatments.


GLOW is supported by a grant from The Alliance for   Better Bone Health (formerly Sanofi-aventis and P&G Atlas earring, now   Sanofi-aventis and Warner Chilcott) and is being directed by The Center for   Outcomes Research, University of Massachusetts Medical School.For more   information please contact: Sarabjit Jagirdar



Copyright © HT Media Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

05:47, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

Andrea Murray, Group Director of Strategy at the   Equality Butterfly pendantHuman Rights Commission, said:


"We welcome the Treasury Committee's report on Women   in the City. Much of its findings mirror what the Commission has found during   its own inquiry into the finance sector.


"What is clear is that urgent action is needed to   address both the barriers that women face in progressing their careers in the   finance industry and the gender pay gap - which is larger than any other sector   in the economy. A modern Britain should be shocked at a gender pay gap within   this sector that is almost twice as bad as the economy-wide gap experienced by   women back in the 1970s.


"Finance organisations need to take action to bring   down arbitrary barriers and change practices that, intentionally or not, inhibit   women's success. As the Committee has recognised, these actions include   conducting annual equal pay audits and implementing flexible working practices   which employees feel they can take advantage of without damaging their   prospects. By doing this, finance organisations have the chance to boost morale,   bring on new talent, and maximise the potential of their existing employees.


"The Commission will continue to work with companies   in the finance industry and the FSA to take forward the recommendations of the   Commission's own inquiry and to support progress in this area."


For more information contact the Equality and Human   Rights Commission Media Office on 02031170255, out of hours 07767272818. Notes   to editors Inquiry Terms of Reference


The Equality and Human Rights Commission is Butterfly pendant   out an Inquiry into sex discrimination in the financial services sector under   section 16 of the Equality Act 2006. The terms of reference are to:


1. Inquire into the gender pay gap and pay trends   across the financial services sector


2. Inquire into the extent and nature of sex   discrimination in relation to recruitment, terms and conditions, promotion,   career paths, retention and workplace culture across the financial services   sector


3. Examine measures used by employers and other   organisations to address sex discrimination and inequalities in pay and status   and to assess the effectiveness of such measures


4. Assess and analyse the differential impact of job   losses in the sector


5. Consider any other matters as appear to the   Commission to be relevant to the above


6. Make such recommendations as are appropriate.


The Commission's Phase 1 report launched in April   2009 included an analysis of Labour Force Survey and the Heart Link earrings Survey of Hours   and Employment and found that:



In a crew of 277 Sailors, 33 women have made their mark on history as the first enlisted females to deploy aboard the warship.

05:46, 26.04.2010 .. 0 Kommentar(e) .. Link

Though Carney has had several female officers on   board since her commissioning April 13, 1996, it was Paloma until February 2009   that the ship allowed enlisted females to become a part of the crew.


After checking onto the ship in April 2009, Chief   Yeoman Syretta Revels helped the junior female Sailors make the transition to   living aboard ship.


"I wasn't supposed to check on board until June,"   said Revels. "But I received an e-mail from the Command Master Chief asking me   to come early to help with the younger females. I felt very welcomed in the fact   they came to me for guidance. I didn't feel at all like I needed to prove   myself."


Command Master Chief Ross Cramer said he was happy to   see Carney finally bring women aboard even if it did take a little longer than   other ships of its kind. -"The ship was built in the era when we were slowly   integrating women into combat rolls," he said. "Women were on ships, but they   were not directly involved in hostile combat. So, when Carney was built, it was   built for men to go into battle, women facilities were not part of the   planning."


After a shipyard period in 2008, Carney was prepared   to house 42 female Sailors in a newly furbished berthing, -"The integration has   gone very well," said Cramer. -"This crew is very close. Once someone checks   aboard, we give them a Carney ball cap, and they are family."


In the year following the yard period, the number of   enlisted females increased from five to 33, and with a deployment approaching,   getting everyone settled in became the number one priority.


"We started to work on a deployment list," said   Intelligence Specialist 1st Class Shenna Gaston. "We had a newly furbished   berthing so we didn't have to do much in getting anything ready there, but we   helped the younger girls make list of things to remember. Anything that would   Paloma's Zellige pandant the deployment be more comfortable for them."


Gaston, along with some of the other females who had   made previous deployments on other ships, said that the integration was not an   issue for them.


"It wasn't anything new for me," said Gaston. "Coming   from other ships that have already been integrated makes it easy. As for the   younger girls, they seem to be doing well with it also. Seeing as this is a   first deployment for a lot of them, they don't know any different so it has   worked out well for all of us."


After more than a century of women serving in the   U.S. Navy and more than 25 years of women serving aboard ships, the women of   Carney have bee hard worked hard in their first year, showing that they   belong.


"I actually made it a point to be the first female to   earn my Enlisted Surface Warfare pin," said Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Renee   Hotchkiss. "I was also the first female Blue Jacket of the Quarter. I have   worked hard, but I have never felt like I had to prove myself. That surprised me   because I figured coming to a ship full of males that would be the first thing I   had to do, but they welcomed us with open arms."


"Diversity makes us stronger and different opinions   brought to the table make for a better decisions," said Cramer. "A Sailor is a   Sailor, regardless if they are male or female."


In 1979, 55 female officers and 375 enlisted women   were assigned to 21 ships in both the Atlantic and Pacific fleets. The repair   ship USS Vulcan (AR 5) was the first Navy ship on which women were deployed.   Today, thousands of women are serving in the Navy, ashore and around the fleet.   Carney women are proud to be a part of that history.


Carney is attached to the Dwight D. Eisenhower   Carrier Strike Group in support of maritime security operations in the U.S. 5th   fleet Area of Responsibility.


Carney's mission is to conduct prompt, sustained   combat operations at sea in support of U.S. national policy. The ship is   equipped to Tiffany Hearts double pendant independently or as part of a carrier strike group or   expeditionary strike group.



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